How LGBT-Friendly Are The NYT's 52 Places to Go? Part VII

1.24.2014

By Kevin Okeeffe

Switzerland disappoints, while the Mekong is probably best observed in photographs.

The New York Times’ Travel section set out an ambitious travel plan for readers recently with their “52 Places to Go in 2014.” But how LGBT-friendly are these exotic locales? Which places will have your
back, and what destinations are not worthy of your patronage? We'll be breaking down the places on the list over the next few weeks. By now, you have some great, LGBT-accepting locations to consider -- here's a few more.

Umea, Sweden
As early as 2006, the Swedes were on board for marriage equality, leading to its establishment in 2009. With change of gender and same-sex couple adoption also legal and discrimination protections in place, Umea is a fantastic destination to consider.

Xishuangbanna, China
The admittedly mild good news is that same-sex sexual activity is legal in the People’s Republic. The bad news is that every other expected right — discrimination protection, marriage equality, adoption rights — doesn’t apply here.

Andermatt, Switzerland
You’d expect mild-mannered Switzerland to be one of the most progressive European countries, but you’d only be kind of right. The Swiss are moving towards legalizing same-sex couples’ adoptions, but they’re not there yet. Nor have they established marriage equality. Same-sex sexual activity is legal, however, so it’s not all bad news.

Indianapolis
Indiana’s a bit of a mixed bag: same-sex couples can adopt. However, there’s no hate crime statute here, nor is marriage equality established.

Mekong River
The Mekong stretches through several countries, including ill-advised places like Cambodia, Laos and Burma. Even the most LGBT-accepting Asian nations like China and Vietnam still aren’t exactly friendly. Best to consider other rivers before the Mekong.

 

See also:
Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four

Part Five

Part Six

Tags: Travel Tips

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