How LGBT-Friendly Are The New York Times' 52 Places to Go? Part IV

1.21.2014

By Kevin Okeeffe

You probably don't want to go to Kenya any time soon.

The New York Times’ Travel section set out an ambitious travel plan for readers recently with their “52 Places to Go in 2014.” But how LGBT-friendly are these exotic locales? Which places will have your back, and what destinations are not worthy of your patronage? We'll be breaking down the places on the list over the next few weeks. See the fourth group of five below.

Scotland
Unlike in England and Wales, marriage equality in Scotland is still in flux pending a vote on their Marriage and Civil Partnerships Bill in February. Same-sex couples can also adopt, and same-sex relations have been legal for decades. [UPDATE 2/4: Marriage equality has been established in Scotland.]

Calgary, Alberta
Our neighbors to the north were ahead of the curve on marriage equality: It’s been established in Canada since 2005. Same-sex sexual relations and adoption are also permitted nationwide, but notably, Alberta is on the low end of the scale in terms of supporting LGBT rights.

Ishikagi, Japan
Good news: The majority of Japanese citizens support accepting homosexuality. Bad news: that hasn’t done much for same-sex rights. Marriage equality remains unestablished, though Japanese nationals are allowed to marry abroad. Gender reassignment surgery has been legal since 2008.

Lakipia Plateau, Kenya
According to the UN’s Human Rights Committee, homosexuality “is largely considered to be taboo and repugnant to cultural values and morality” in Kenya. So probably not your favored honeymoon destination. There are no laws in your favor.

Yogyakarta, Indonesia
It’s no Kenya, but Indonesia has a ways to go as well. There’s no legal recognition of same-sex couples nationally, nor are there legal discrimination protections. At least same-sex sexual relations aren’t criminal.

Stay tuned for more on the Gray Lady's list.

See also:
Part One
Part Two
Part Three

Tags: Travel Tips

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