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I do, I do, I do, I do, I do, I do: Getting married in Canada

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Photos in order: Aefa Mulholland; Getty Images

Story by Aefa Mulholland

We’ve been getting a lot of letters asking about how to get married in Canada, so for those of you eager to get hitched north of the border, here’s how to do those I do’s.

1. Neither one of you has to be a Canadian resident, but you do need a province-specific marriage license – so first decide where you want to get married.

2. Apply for a marriage license. The most popular provinces for Americans to get married in are British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Some provinces require just one person to apply (B.C., Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador), the others require both people to do so. All provinces require proof of divorce if either of the grooms- or brides-to-be has been married before. Each province and territory has different documentation requirements, fees, and wait times (from 24 hours to 20 days).

3. Arrange a religious or civil ceremony. Provincial websites have helpful details on how to go about finding marriage commissioners. Don’t forget to bring or organize two witnesses.

4. Get married!

5. Get a Marriage Statement.

6. Register marriage within 48 hours of the ceremony.

7. Receive a legal Marriage Certificate from the provincial Vital Statistics agency.

Sounds too complicated? Call up one of these top Canadian wedding planners.


Photos in order: Aefa Mulholland; Getty Images

Story by Aefa Mulholland

We’ve been getting a lot of letters asking about how to get married in Canada, so for those of you eager to get hitched north of the border, here’s how to do those I do’s.

1. Neither one of you has to be a Canadian resident, but you do need a province-specific marriage license – so first decide where you want to get married.

2. Apply for a marriage license. The most popular provinces for Americans to get married in are British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Some provinces require just one person to apply (B.C., Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador), the others require both people to do so. All provinces require proof of divorce if either of the grooms- or brides-to-be has been married before. Each province and territory has different documentation requirements, fees, and wait times (from 24 hours to 20 days).

3. Arrange a religious or civil ceremony. Provincial websites have helpful details on how to go about finding marriage commissioners. Don’t forget to bring or organize two witnesses.

4. Get married!

5. Get a Marriage Statement.

6. Register marriage within 48 hours of the ceremony.

7. Receive a legal Marriage Certificate from the provincial Vital Statistics agency.

Sounds too complicated? Call up one of these top Canadian wedding planners.


Photos in order: Aefa Mulholland; Getty Images

Story by Aefa Mulholland

We’ve been getting a lot of letters asking about how to get married in Canada, so for those of you eager to get hitched north of the border, here’s how to do those I do’s.

1. Neither one of you has to be a Canadian resident, but you do need a province-specific marriage license – so first decide where you want to get married.

2. Apply for a marriage license. The most popular provinces for Americans to get married in are British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Some provinces require just one person to apply (B.C., Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador), the others require both people to do so. All provinces require proof of divorce if either of the grooms- or brides-to-be has been married before. Each province and territory has different documentation requirements, fees, and wait times (from 24 hours to 20 days).

3. Arrange a religious or civil ceremony. Provincial websites have helpful details on how to go about finding marriage commissioners. Don’t forget to bring or organize two witnesses.

4. Get married!

5. Get a Marriage Statement.

6. Register marriage within 48 hours of the ceremony.

7. Receive a legal Marriage Certificate from the provincial Vital Statistics agency.

Sounds too complicated? Call up one of these top Canadian wedding planners.

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