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London Theater Group Offers VIP Packages

London1.pjg
Story by C. Brian Smith; images courtesy The Really Useful Group

For decades, London’s West End theater district has been synonymous with Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber and his multitude of hit musicals. His company, “The Really Useful Group,” currently owns and operates seven of the oldest and most famous theaters in London. 

  • The Cambridge Theatre, home to Chicago

  • The Theatre Royal Drury Lane, home to Oliver!

  • Her Majesty’s Theatre, home to Phantom of the Opera

  • The London Palladium, home to Sister Act – The Musical

  • The New London Theatre, home to War Horse

  • The Palace Theatre, home to Priscilla Queen of the Desert, The Musical (see above)

  • The Adelphi Theatre, co-owned by Nederlander International, home to Love Never Dies

While any self-respecting homosexual has seen (or performed in) at least four of these productions, The Really Useful Group is offering a series of VIP packages designed to provide the true theater fanatic with a completely unique hospitality experience.


For example, guests purchasing Luxury VIP packages are greeted by a red-coated butler and taken to one of the theater's opulent private rooms, where they are served tasty canapes and vintage Champagne. Each of the rooms has its own fascinating history -- Royals traditionally dined and met with cast members and others after the show. 

London2
Above: At intermission, a red-coated butler prepares for guests arrival in one of the London Palladium’s private rooms.

I dined, pre-curtain call, in the Palace Theatre’s D'Oyly Carte Resturant with its marbled walls and domed ceiling.  This and many other hidden enclaves throughout RUG’s theatres have undergone a massive restoration, and the results are very impressive.

London3
The Palace Theatre’s basement, restored to its original glory, now serves as a delightful brasserie.Waiter Kris Marc-Joseph (right, boa’d), fabulous in every way, provides unending bits of trivia about West End’s theater district.     

During intermission, guests are shown back to their room where more libations and desserts await -- and perhaps a great deal more. “For those wishing to have the Platinum Experience, anything is possible,” says Mark Pacheco, Head of Hospitality for Really Useful group. I furrow my brow and rebut, Artful Dodger-style, "Anything?" Without missing a beat, our boa-clad waiter Kris Marc-Joseph answers in a song, "any-thing ... for you!" 

“Why shouldn’t anything be possible?” Mark continues, “The West End is all about fantasies and dreams coming true.  That’s what we’re committed to.  Backstage tours, seven course meals, personalized mementos -- we’ve even had an on–stage proposal.”

The food is on par with many of the overpriced restaurants in theater row, but the service and, of course, the decor, is superb.  My mediocre Caesar salad becomes far more enjoyable when I learn that the piano in the corner is Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber’s. I like to think he came up with Evita on that thing. Or at least Starlight Express. Mark notices my eye, and I'm forced to admit that, like so many many wide-eyed gay teens, I once flirted with a career in musical theater but never made it onto a big stage.  Mark smiles and winks at Hannah, the red coated butler, and whispers something to her. 

As the second act overture swells, a member of the cast grabs my hand and sweeps me onto the stage.  Before I know it, I’m two-stepping with an ensemble of drag queens and ripped, shirtless men in front of a packed, thousand-seat West End theater.  Anything is possible, it seems. 

For more information contact Mark Pacheco, Head of Hospitality: hospitality@reallyuseful.co.uk

or visit their website: Really Useful Group.

London1.pjg
Story by C. Brian Smith; images courtesy The Really Useful Group

For decades, London’s West End theater district has been synonymous with Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber and his multitude of hit musicals. His company, “The Really Useful Group,” currently owns and operates seven of the oldest and most famous theaters in London. 

  • The Cambridge Theatre, home to Chicago

  • The Theatre Royal Drury Lane, home to Oliver!

  • Her Majesty’s Theatre, home to Phantom of the Opera

  • The London Palladium, home to Sister Act – The Musical

  • The New London Theatre, home to War Horse

  • The Palace Theatre, home to Priscilla Queen of the Desert, The Musical (see above)

  • The Adelphi Theatre, co-owned by Nederlander International, home to Love Never Dies

While any self-respecting homosexual has seen (or performed in) at least four of these productions, The Really Useful Group is offering a series of VIP packages designed to provide the true theater fanatic with a completely unique hospitality experience.


For example, guests purchasing Luxury VIP packages are greeted by a red-coated butler and taken to one of the theater's opulent private rooms, where they are served tasty canapes and vintage Champagne. Each of the rooms has its own fascinating history -- Royals traditionally dined and met with cast members and others after the show. 

London2
Above: At intermission, a red-coated butler prepares for guests arrival in one of the London Palladium’s private rooms.

I dined, pre-curtain call, in the Palace Theatre’s D'Oyly Carte Resturant with its marbled walls and domed ceiling.  This and many other hidden enclaves throughout RUG’s theatres have undergone a massive restoration, and the results are very impressive.

London3
The Palace Theatre’s basement, restored to its original glory, now serves as a delightful brasserie.Waiter Kris Marc-Joseph (right, boa’d), fabulous in every way, provides unending bits of trivia about West End’s theater district.     

During intermission, guests are shown back to their room where more libations and desserts await -- and perhaps a great deal more. “For those wishing to have the Platinum Experience, anything is possible,” says Mark Pacheco, Head of Hospitality for Really Useful group. I furrow my brow and rebut, Artful Dodger-style, "Anything?" Without missing a beat, our boa-clad waiter Kris Marc-Joseph answers in a song, "any-thing ... for you!" 

“Why shouldn’t anything be possible?” Mark continues, “The West End is all about fantasies and dreams coming true.  That’s what we’re committed to.  Backstage tours, seven course meals, personalized mementos -- we’ve even had an on–stage proposal.”

The food is on par with many of the overpriced restaurants in theater row, but the service and, of course, the decor, is superb.  My mediocre Caesar salad becomes far more enjoyable when I learn that the piano in the corner is Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber’s. I like to think he came up with Evita on that thing. Or at least Starlight Express. Mark notices my eye, and I'm forced to admit that, like so many many wide-eyed gay teens, I once flirted with a career in musical theater but never made it onto a big stage.  Mark smiles and winks at Hannah, the red coated butler, and whispers something to her. 

As the second act overture swells, a member of the cast grabs my hand and sweeps me onto the stage.  Before I know it, I’m two-stepping with an ensemble of drag queens and ripped, shirtless men in front of a packed, thousand-seat West End theater.  Anything is possible, it seems. 

For more information contact Mark Pacheco, Head of Hospitality: hospitality@reallyuseful.co.uk

or visit their website: Really Useful Group.


Story by C. Brian Smith; images courtesy The Really Useful Group

For decades, London’s West End theater district has been synonymous with Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber and his multitude of hit musicals. His company, “The Really Useful Group,” currently owns and operates seven of the oldest and most famous theaters in London. 

  • The Cambridge Theatre, home to Chicago

  • The Theatre Royal Drury Lane, home to Oliver!

  • Her Majesty’s Theatre, home to Phantom of the Opera

  • The London Palladium, home to Sister Act – The Musical

  • The New London Theatre, home to War Horse

  • The Palace Theatre, home to Priscilla Queen of the Desert, The Musical (see above)

  • The Adelphi Theatre, co-owned by Nederlander International, home to Love Never Dies

While any self-respecting homosexual has seen (or performed in) at least four of these productions, The Really Useful Group is offering a series of VIP packages designed to provide the true theater fanatic with a completely unique hospitality experience.


For example, guests purchasing Luxury VIP packages are greeted by a red-coated butler and taken to one of the theater's opulent private rooms, where they are served tasty canapes and vintage Champagne. Each of the rooms has its own fascinating history -- Royals traditionally dined and met with cast members and others after the show. 


Above: At intermission, a red-coated butler prepares for guests arrival in one of the London Palladium’s private rooms.

I dined, pre-curtain call, in the Palace Theatre’s D'Oyly Carte Resturant with its marbled walls and domed ceiling.  This and many other hidden enclaves throughout RUG’s theatres have undergone a massive restoration, and the results are very impressive.


The Palace Theatre’s basement, restored to its original glory, now serves as a delightful brasserie.Waiter Kris Marc-Joseph (right, boa’d), fabulous in every way, provides unending bits of trivia about West End’s theater district.     

During intermission, guests are shown back to their room where more libations and desserts await -- and perhaps a great deal more. “For those wishing to have the Platinum Experience, anything is possible,” says Mark Pacheco, Head of Hospitality for Really Useful group. I furrow my brow and rebut, Artful Dodger-style, "Anything?" Without missing a beat, our boa-clad waiter Kris Marc-Joseph answers in a song, "any-thing ... for you!" 

“Why shouldn’t anything be possible?” Mark continues, “The West End is all about fantasies and dreams coming true.

  That’s what we’re committed to.  Backstage tours, seven course meals, personalized mementos -- we’ve even had an on–stage proposal.”

The food is on par with many of the overpriced restaurants in theater row, but the service and, of course, the decor, is superb.  My mediocre Caesar salad becomes far more enjoyable when I learn that the piano in the corner is Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber’s. I like to think he came up with Evita on that thing. Or at least Starlight Express. Mark notices my eye, and I'm forced to admit that, like so many many wide-eyed gay teens, I once flirted with a career in musical theater but never made it onto a big stage.  Mark smiles and winks at Hannah, the red coated butler, and whispers something to her. 

As the second act overture swells, a member of the cast grabs my hand and sweeps me onto the stage.  Before I know it, I’m two-stepping with an ensemble of drag queens and ripped, shirtless men in front of a packed, thousand-seat West End theater.  Anything is possible, it seems. 

For more information contact Mark Pacheco, Head of Hospitality: hospitality@reallyuseful.co.uk

or visit their website: Really Useful Group.

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