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I Know This Place in... Reykjavik

Fpo_FISH_CHIPS

Photo: Mike McGoran/Getty Images

Icelandic Fish & Chips (Tryggvagötu 8; +354-511-1118) may not have the sexiest name, but its approach to crispy comfort food is anything but ordinary. The organic bistro offers three or four types of fresh fish each day,from favorites like cod and haddock to more exotic local catches like spotted catfish, which are dunked in a spelt and barley batter and fried until golden and crunchy. Each dish is served with roasted potatoes and “skyronnaise”—a trademark tartar sauce made from skyr, a unique Icelandic dairy product similar to Greek yogurt flavored with unexpected ingredient combos like rosemary and green apple or orange and black pepper. The restaurant is a welcome option when you just can’t face another meal of more daunting Icelandic fare, like rotten shark meat or foal sausage.

 

 

Fpo_FISH_CHIPS

Photo: Mike McGoran/Getty Images

Icelandic Fish & Chips (Tryggvagötu 8; +354-511-1118) may not have the sexiest name, but its approach to crispy comfort food is anything but ordinary. The organic bistro offers three or four types of fresh fish each day,from favorites like cod and haddock to more exotic local catches like spotted catfish, which are dunked in a spelt and barley batter and fried until golden and crunchy. Each dish is served with roasted potatoes and “skyronnaise”—a trademark tartar sauce made from skyr, a unique Icelandic dairy product similar to Greek yogurt flavored with unexpected ingredient combos like rosemary and green apple or orange and black pepper. The restaurant is a welcome option when you just can’t face another meal of more daunting Icelandic fare, like rotten shark meat or foal sausage.

 

 

Photo: Mike McGoran/Getty Images

Icelandic Fish & Chips (Tryggvagötu 8; +354-511-1118) may not have the sexiest name, but its approach to crispy comfort food is anything but ordinary. The organic bistro offers three or four types of fresh fish each day,from favorites like cod and haddock to more exotic local catches like spotted catfish, which are dunked in a spelt and barley batter and fried until golden and crunchy. Each dish is served with roasted potatoes and “skyronnaise”—a trademark tartar sauce made from skyr, a unique Icelandic dairy product similar to Greek yogurt flavored with unexpected ingredient combos like rosemary and green apple or orange and black pepper. The restaurant is a welcome option when you just can’t face another meal of more daunting Icelandic fare, like rotten shark meat or foal sausage.

 

 

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