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10 Years Later: The National September 11 Memorial Opens

911Courtesy of 9/11 Memorial
 

10 years ago, the WTC terrorist attacks changed the world. How do we remember the LGBT victims of the attacks? 

David Charlesbois, a member of the National Gay Pilots Association, was the co-pilot of the American Airlines Flight 77, the plane that crashed into the Pentagon.

Eugene Clark, 47, worked on the 102nd floor of the South Tower. He sent his partner Larry a voicemail stating “I’m OK. The plane hit the other tower. We are just evacuating”. Eugene is still missing.

Jeffery Collman was a flight attendant on American Airlines Flight 11, which crashed into the North Tower. His partner Keith of 11 years keeps his memories alive.

Luke Dudek, 50, worked for Windows on the World as a food and beverage controller. He is survived by his partner of 20 years, George.

Together 13 years, Ronald Gamboa, 33, and Dan Brandhorst, 42, were traveling with their 3-year-old adopted son, David on United Airlines Flight 175. It crashed into the second tower of the World Trade Center.

These are just but a few of the heroes that will be honored next week when the the National 9/11 Memorial opens in New York City. It is a tribute of remembrance to nearly 3,000 people killed in the terrorists’ attacks of September 11 at the World Trade Center site, and the plane crashes near Shanksville, PA and at the Pentagon. It will also commemorate the six people killed in the WTC bombing in February 1993.

911Courtesy of 9/11 Memorial
 

10 years ago, the WTC terrorist attacks changed the world. How do we remember the LGBT victims of the attacks? 

David Charlesbois, a member of the National Gay Pilots Association, was the co-pilot of the American Airlines Flight 77, the plane that crashed into the Pentagon.

Eugene Clark, 47, worked on the 102nd floor of the South Tower. He sent his partner Larry a voicemail stating “I’m OK. The plane hit the other tower. We are just evacuating”. Eugene is still missing.

Jeffery Collman was a flight attendant on American Airlines Flight 11, which crashed into the North Tower. His partner Keith of 11 years keeps his memories alive.

Luke Dudek, 50, worked for Windows on the World as a food and beverage controller. He is survived by his partner of 20 years, George.

Together 13 years, Ronald Gamboa, 33, and Dan Brandhorst, 42, were traveling with their 3-year-old adopted son, David on United Airlines Flight 175. It crashed into the second tower of the World Trade Center.

These are just but a few of the heroes that will be honored next week when the the National 9/11 Memorial opens in New York City. It is a tribute of remembrance to nearly 3,000 people killed in the terrorists’ attacks of September 11 at the World Trade Center site, and the plane crashes near Shanksville, PA and at the Pentagon. It will also commemorate the six people killed in the WTC bombing in February 1993.

The memorial features two reflecting pools, sitting within the footprints of the previous Twin Towers. It will highlight the largest manmade waterfall in North America, and edging the pools will sit bronze panels, which will have each name inscribed of the people who died.

From September 12 the memorial will be on display for the public, however, because of ongoing construction around the WTC site a temporary timed reservation system has been put in place to ensure each visitor receives a safe and meaningful experience.

 

Reserve an advance date and time pass:

Visit.911Memorial.org and follow the links

The 9/11 Memorial is free, however if you would like to make a donation you are more than welcome.

 

Hours of Operation:

 From September 12 – January 8, 2012

 Monday – Friday 10 A.M. – 8 P.M.

Weekends 9 A.M. – 8 P.M.

 

From January 9, 2012 – March 10, 2012

Monday – Sunday 10 A.M. – 6 P.M.

 

Address:

Located at the former World Trader Center site in lower Manhattan.

Enter at northeast corner of Albany and Greenwich streets.

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