Jerrod Carmichael
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Celeb-Backed Gay Bar Refused Women, Blatinos, Says Lawsuit

Celeb-Backed Gay Bar Refused Women, Blatinos, Says Lawsuit

In a lawsuit filed in court last month, a former employee of The Q said the popular NYC nightclub regularly discriminated against Black, Latinx, women, and trans folks in an attempt to appeal to “white boys.”

In addition to the disturbing charges of racism, misogyny, and transphobia at the club which touted celebrity investors Charlie Carver and Zachary Quinto, the suit brought by Frank “Frankie” Sharp also alleges partner Alan Pikus permitted entrance to underaged patrons and folks selling the GBH date rape drug, and also engaged in acts of sex with customers in front of employees. Sharp is alleging The Q’s ownership unfairly fired and defrauded him in the lawsuit.

“Though The Q’s core brand was inclusiveness, Pikus was vocal in his discriminatory beliefs and was hostile to the club catering to any group other than white young men, telling Sharp repeatedly: “Make sure your Latin nights are the good kind of Latins. Not Blatinos,” Sharp alleged in the suit filed June 22 with the State Supreme Court of the State and County of New York. “He wanted special measures taken against customers that: “looked like they were from the Bronx.” 

Sharp made a series of disturbing claims in the court documents. He claimed Pikus “was adamant the priority was to make The Q: “comfortable for white twinks” and “don’t alienate the white boys.”

Pikus also allegedly told one manager, “I don’t need to break my back to hire people just because they’re black or trans.”

Sharp also alleged Pikus became enraged when he learned security for The Q was preventing entry to underaged patrons seeking to drink illegally and to dealers of the date rape drug GHB.

“When he found out security continued to do their job, Pikus was irate and called Sharp saying: ‘I’m going to read Edwin [the head of security] the riot act. They’re taking our boys’ GHB away,’” Sharp alleged in the suit.

Sharp claims in the suit that ownership defrauded him out of his rightful position as an owner and partner, saying they preyed upon his naivete when they convinced him to sign an at-will contract when they had previously promised him otherwise.

“I was, in a word: gas-lit,” Sharp wrote in a post to Facebook, noting the slow deterioration of the culture at the club and how the ownership deceived him as to their true intentions.

“I must presume that the partners -in the beginning- had to keep me compliant at least long enough to acquire ownership of my intellectual properties, my credibility, access to my celebrity investors, and entry into my social network,” he continued. “Once the club was a proven financial success, and the partners believed they had taken what they wanted from me, their behavior swiftly darkened.”

Last week, Q NYC denied all accusations leveled against the club but also used the same social media post to announce a replacement for Pikus in his role as executive producer.

“While we vehemently deny the hurtful allegations that have recently surfaced, we are committed to end the very division within our community that Q’s programming and mission were designed to combat. Luis Fernando, who was hired in mid-June to fill the role of Creative Director, will be taking over Alan Picus's role as Executive Producer of the Q. I look forward to what Luis will create,” The Q posted to social media.

The denials and actions of The Q notwithstanding, Sharp said the controversy surrounding the case will not die down anytime soon.

“There is much more to tell,” he teased readers in his Facebook post.

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