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Exclusive | San Francisco: Where to Eat Part Two

Exclusive | San Francisco: Where to Eat Part Two

The Castro continued...

Pasta Pomodoro (2304 Market St; 415-558-8123; $8) is a tiny outpost of the small chain of 40+ casual Italian restaurants. It?s very affordable, very good, and usually packed. Harvey's (500 Castro St; 415-431-4278; $6-14) serves up pub grub as well as a popular Sunday brunch, right in the heart of the Castro.

Nirvana (544 Castro St; 415-861-2226; $9-18) is a very popular noodle house. Bombay (2217 Market St; 415-861-6655; $8-13) has brought a much-needed infusion of Indian food into the neighborhood. The food's fine, though the service can be a bit slow.

There has been a virtual sushi explosion in the Castro over the past few years, and much of it is good. Osaka Sushi (460 Castro St; 415-255-8828; $9-18) is perhaps the most popular, thanks to its location in the center of the Castro. The bento boxes are reasonably good. Across the globe, La Méditerranée (288 Noe St; 415-431-7210; $9-13), or "La Med" for short, serves up absolutely delish Greek and Middle-Eastern fare in a cozy and warm atmosphere. Sup on such succulent treats as pomegranate chicken and lamb kebabs. Get there early. This place fills up fast!

Café Flore (2298 Market St; 415-621-8579; $7-20) is known to locals as Café Hairdo, Café Whore, and Café Attitude. Suffice it to say that it?s v. gay, with a nice outdoor patio and a light menu. Though still sceney, Café Flore is much less popular than it used to be.

If you need a little something sweet, or an espresso-based pick-me-up, Spike's Coffee & Teas (4117 19th St; 415-626-5573) will fill the bill. Named for the large Russian urns used to boil water for tea, Samovar Tea Lounge (498 Sanchez St; 415-626-4700) serves up a hot cup of global tea culture. Tasty treats such as tea-dusted pumpkin seeds or edamame with Korean nori, complement a wide array of fine teas, from white to black. Among the star brews are the selection of Chinese puerhteas, so refined they actually have vintages going back to 1930. (Puerhteas are unique in that they improve with age.) The Castro-adjacent location ensures a steady stream of locals.

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five | Part Six

Part Seven

San Francisco: Introduction
San Francisco: Where to Stay
San Francisco: Where to Play/Meet
San Francisco: What to See & Do
San Francisco: Where to Shop
San Francisco: Resources

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