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Tour of the New High Line Park in NYC

Gardennorth
Story and photos by Ed Salvato, editor in chief of OutTraveler.com; photo of the High Line, looking north, from 13th St.

GansevortnorthToday I took a hard-hat tour of the High Line led by Katie Lorah (right), the media relations manager for Friends of the High Line, the organization largely responsible for development of this incredibly cool project. The original structure, an elevated freight rail line, was built between 1929 and 1934 and spans 22  blocks from Gansevoort St. (where our tour began) to 34th St. There is approximately 6.7 acres of space atop the elevated deck.

GansevortsouthThe first section, spanning a half mile from Gansevoort St to 20th St along 10th Ave, is scheduled to open by mid-June, just in time for Gay Pride, June 20-28. The photo above was taken around 13th street looking north. The park will include walkways, benches, plantings (amid the old rails), water features, a children's mini-park and public access points every few blocks.

The park winds its way past former factories and beneath the new Standard Hotel (below left). With unobstructed views west across the Hudson River towards New EdrollingbenchesJersey, the park also features wooden lounge chairs  on wheels that can be moved back and forth along the rail lines. You can see the wheels in the lower-left corner of the picture below to the right. That's me, Ed Salvato, with my hard hat, pointing to the wheels.

 Be on the look out for an article on the High Line in the May issue of the Advocate, our sister publication. For trip-planning information on the Big Apple, click on our  NYC Travel Guide or purchase our new Out Traveler: New York, available from Alyson Books, our sister company.

Gardennorth
Story and photos by Ed Salvato, editor in chief of OutTraveler.com; photo of the High Line, looking north, from 13th St.

GansevortnorthToday I took a hard-hat tour of the High Line led by Katie Lorah (right), the media relations manager for Friends of the High Line, the organization largely responsible for development of this incredibly cool project. The original structure, an elevated freight rail line, was built between 1929 and 1934 and spans 22  blocks from Gansevoort St. (where our tour began) to 34th St. There is approximately 6.7 acres of space atop the elevated deck.

EdrollingbenchesJersey, the park also features wooden lounge chairs  on wheels that can be moved back and forth along the rail lines. You can see the wheels in the lower-left corner of the picture below to the right. That's me, Ed Salvato, with my hard hat, pointing to the wheels.

 Be on the look out for an article on the High Line in the May issue of the Advocate, our sister publication. For trip-planning information on the Big Apple, click on our  NYC Travel Guide or purchase our new Out Traveler: New York, available from Alyson Books, our sister company.


Story and photos by Ed Salvato, editor in chief of OutTraveler.com; photo of the High Line, looking north, from 13th St.

Today I took a hard-hat tour of the High Line led by Katie Lorah (right), the media relations manager for Friends of the High Line, the organization largely responsible for development of this incredibly cool project. The original structure, an elevated freight rail line, was built between 1929 and 1934 and spans 22  blocks from Gansevoort St. (where our tour began) to 34th St. There is approximately 6.7 acres of space atop the elevated deck.

The first section, spanning a half mile from Gansevoort St to 20th St along 10th Ave, is scheduled to open by mid-June, just in time for Gay Pride, June 20-28. The photo above was taken around 13th street looking north. The park will include walkways, benches, plantings (amid the old rails), water features, a children's mini-park and public access points every few blocks.

The park winds its way past former factories and beneath the new Standard Hotel (below left). With unobstructed views west across the Hudson River towards New Jersey, the park also features wooden lounge chairs  on wheels that can be moved back and forth along the rail lines. You can see the wheels in the lower-left corner of the picture below to the right. That's me, Ed Salvato, with my hard hat, pointing to the wheels.

 Be on the look out for an article on the High Line in the May issue of the Advocate, our sister publication. For trip-planning information on the Big Apple, click on our  NYC Travel Guide or purchase our new Out Traveler: New York, available from Alyson Books, our sister company.

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