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London Pre-Pride: Wimbledon

Untitled1
Story and images by C. Brian Smith; Above: Wimbledon Village

Planning the day before Pride can be tricky. The last thing you want to do is
overextend yourself – parades and hangovers do not mix. Attending the London pride
festival offers a very unique option in that it coincides with the final rounds
of Wimbledon, the most storied tennis tournament in the world.  A thirty-minute tube ride and a brief
stroll through a picturesque farm town plants you at the gates of the All
England Tennis and Croquet Club
, EST 1868

Untitled2 You’re more likely to stumble upon a golden ticket to the
Wonka factory than one to Centre Court at Wimbledon (most of the tickets are
reserved for club members, the others handed out in a series of complex
lotteries). No matter -- the best
parts of Wimbledon can be experienced with a £20 grounds pass.

Grab the requisite bowl of strawberries n’ cream and a Pims
Cup and casually stroll around the outer courts, where you can sit front row
and watch some of the best players in the world compete (in short white
shorts.)  


Untitled3 Right: Since the 1860’s, Pimms has
remained the British summertime drink of choice. And at only 50 proof, it's a
bit safer to sip courtside, where decorum counts.  Careful, though, they go down a little too easy on a sunny
day.


A tour of the Wimbledon
Lawn Tennis Museum
is well worth the £18.00.  Here you’ll find an impressive display of tennis outfits,
rackets, and championship trophies on display. The tour, guided by highly
knowledgeable and friendly ambassadors of the club, allows visitors to access
areas off-limits to the general public, including the press room, players’
area, and the illustrious Centre Court. 


Untitled4

Above: Hungary's Marton Fucsovics, 18, who went on to claim the 2010 Wimbledon Juniors Championship, returns serve on one of the surrounding courts.


Untitled5
Left: In a recreation of the 1980s Gentleman's Dressing Room, a
ghost-like image of John McEnroe appears and takes you through a tour of the
normally off-limits area. McEnroe reminisces about his memories about the
Dressing Room, including how he first met Jimmy Connors and how he would
emotionally prepare himself for matches.
Courtesy of Wimbledon Lawn
Tennis Museum.


Untitled6
Above: While match tickets at Centre Court are very difficult to
come by, the tour allows visitors a brief visit and photo op. 

 

 

 

Untitled1
Story and images by C. Brian Smith; Above: Wimbledon Village

Planning the day before Pride can be tricky. The last thing you want to do is
overextend yourself – parades and hangovers do not mix. Attending the London pride
festival offers a very unique option in that it coincides with the final rounds
of Wimbledon, the most storied tennis tournament in the world.  A thirty-minute tube ride and a brief
stroll through a picturesque farm town plants you at the gates of the All
England Tennis and Croquet Club
, EST 1868

Untitled2 You’re more likely to stumble upon a golden ticket to the
Wonka factory than one to Centre Court at Wimbledon (most of the tickets are
reserved for club members, the others handed out in a series of complex
lotteries). No matter -- the best
parts of Wimbledon can be experienced with a £20 grounds pass.

Grab the requisite bowl of strawberries n’ cream and a Pims
Cup and casually stroll around the outer courts, where you can sit front row
and watch some of the best players in the world compete (in short white
shorts.)  


Untitled3 Right: Since the 1860’s, Pimms has
remained the British summertime drink of choice. And at only 50 proof, it's a
bit safer to sip courtside, where decorum counts.  Careful, though, they go down a little too easy on a sunny
day.


A tour of the Wimbledon
Lawn Tennis Museum
is well worth the £18.00.  Here you’ll find an impressive display of tennis outfits,
rackets, and championship trophies on display. The tour, guided by highly
knowledgeable and friendly ambassadors of the club, allows visitors to access
areas off-limits to the general public, including the press room, players’
area, and the illustrious Centre Court. 


Untitled4

Above: Hungary's Marton Fucsovics, 18, who went on to claim the 2010 Wimbledon Juniors Championship, returns serve on one of the surrounding courts.


Untitled5
Left: In a recreation of the 1980s Gentleman's Dressing Room, a
ghost-like image of John McEnroe appears and takes you through a tour of the
normally off-limits area. McEnroe reminisces about his memories about the
Dressing Room, including how he first met Jimmy Connors and how he would
emotionally prepare himself for matches.
Courtesy of Wimbledon Lawn
Tennis Museum.


Untitled6
Above: While match tickets at Centre Court are very difficult to
come by, the tour allows visitors a brief visit and photo op. 

 

 

 

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